Home - Plato's Academy, a blog about everything Greek


Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8

 Fri Dec 13 / 2013

Brazen Bull
Greek: Ορειχαλκινο Ταυρο
Location: Akragas, Sicily
Built: 6th Century BC
Inventor:Perillos of Athens

Brazen Bull

      The brazen bull, (or the Sicilian bull) is a torture and execution device designed in ancient Greece. Perillos of Athens, a brass-founder, proposed to Phalaris, the tyrant of Akragas, Sicily, the invention of a new means for executing criminals. This was done hoping to dissuade the poor population from committing any more crimes. Accordingly, he cast a bull, made entirely of brass, hollow, with a door in the side in the 6th century B.C. The condemned were shut in the bull and a fire was set under it, heating the metal until it became yellow hot and causing the person inside to roast to death. The Brazen Bull became one of the most common methods of execution in Ancient Greece.

Read More >>


 Sun Aug 4 / 2013

Mount Athos
Greek: Ορος Αθως
Located: Northern Greece
What:A monastic community

Mount Athos

      Mount Athos is a mountain and peninsula located in Northern Greece. It is the home of 20 Orthodox monasteries under the direct jurisdiction of the patriarch of Constantinople. It is the oldest surviving monastic community in the world and dates back more than a thousand years. Although part of Greece it is actually governed by its own local administration. Today some 2,000 monkscall Mount Athos their home.

Read More >>


 Sat May 4 / 2013

Diogenes of Sinope
Greek: Διογενης ο Σινωπευς
Born: 412 BC
Died: 323 BC (81 years old)
Field:Philosopher

Diogenes of Sinope

      Diogenes "the Cynic" was an ancient Greek philosopher who was born in Sinope (modern day Sinop, Turkey), a Greek state at the time. Diogenes was exiled from his native city and moved to Athens, where he is said to have become a disciple of Antisthenes, the former pupil of Socrates. Diogenes, a beggar who made his home in the streets of Athens, made a virtue of extreme poverty. He is said to have lived in a large tub, rather than a house, and to have walked through the streets carrying a lamp in the daytime, claiming to be looking for an honest man. He eventually settled in Corinth where he continued to pursue the Cynic ideal of self-sufficiency: a life which was natural and not dependent upon the luxuries of civilization. Believing that virtue was better revealed in action and not theory, his life was a relentless campaign to debunk the social values and institutions of what he saw as a corrupt society.

Read More >>


 Sat Jan 12 / 2013

Ancient Greek Coins
Greek: Αρχαια Ελληνικα Νομισματα
First introduced: 7th Century BC
Denominations: Tetartemorioi, Obol and Drachm

Ancient Greek Coin - Athens Owl

      The Ancient Greeks were among the first people in the world to use a coinage system starting in the 7th century BC. The central denomination of this coinage system was the drachm (meaning "a handful") which derived its name from the fact that six obol (Prior to the coinage system metal sticks were used and were referred to as obol) were usually how much someone could hold in their hand.

Read More >>


Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8

Copyright 2011 Plato's Academy / Theodore Nanos. All Images on this site are property of their respective owners, except where otherwise noted.